The mission of Water Charity is to implement immediate, efficient, and practical projects around the world to provide safe water and effective sanitation to those in need.


Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia

Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

This project was designed to secure access to clean water for Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Villages by installing 3 Blue Pumps. Although the beneficiary communities changed over time, the result was another remarkable success.

Jeremy reports:

I want to let you know that three (3) new Dutch Blue Pumps were installed in Choya, Medina Wallom, and Brikama Lefaya. Fairwater's partner, Swe-Gam, installed them.

Fairwater Foundation was able to offer both Si Kunda and Kalikajara only one Blue Pump each to spread the beneficiary area. Although this was clearly stipulated to their village leaders in our initial meeting with them and that they originally agreed and welcomed receiving one hand pump each, the village chiefs declined the pumps. They insisted that they would only accept two pumps each, because they were worried about having a long wait time with just one pump. While I hate leaving communities to draw water from open wells, with such a short time period left, I had no choice but to defer to willing villages, lest I risk losing the three donated Blue Pumps (each valued at more than $2,500).

Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaWhile I was unable to help Si Kunda and Kalikajara this time, Choya, Medina Wallom, and Brikama Lefaya were each experiencing acute water problems prior to installation of the Blue Pumps. You may recall that in a prior Water Charity project, I rehabilitated Choya's one surviving Mark II pump. But even with that one in working order, with 380 people depending on it, water security was at risk. By supplying a second and more robust pump, we were able to significantly reduce women's pumping and waiting times.

At Medina Wallom, the whole community depended on one Mark II pump. The Blue Pump replaced the residents' second Mark, which broke down last year, severely affecting their dry season gardening. Now, the community has two pumps on which to rely to grow early season bitter tomato, which is their cash crop.

At Brikama Lefaya, 40 residents relied on one Mark II to supply all their domestic water needs, gardening, and cattle watering. By replacing their Mark with a Blue Pump, the higher water output better enables the community to meet all their water demands. Before, women needing to water their gardens in the evening would have to wait extensively so that the cows could drink.

The beneficiaries of this project are:

  • Choya = 380
  • Medina Wallom = 115
  • Brikama Lefaya = 40

With some leftover funds for new parts and by recycling some old parts from decommissioned Mark II's, I plan to repair four more Mark II hand pumps in the following communities before I leave:

  • Medina Wallom (new handle bearings and axle)
  • Demba Kunda (new handle bearings)
  • Pinai (new handle bearings, new cylinder seals, new pipe seals)
  • Kaani Kunda Suba (new handle bearings, new cylinder seals, replacement chain, replacement handle)

We wish to thank Jeremy for completing this terrific project, and again extend our gratitude to the SLOW LIFE Foundation for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaConclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia
Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaConclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia
Conclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaConclusion of Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia

Kanoni Water Tank Project - Uganda

Kanoni Water Tank Project - UgandaThis is the second project to be implemented under the Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – Uganda, and the fifth project to be integrated into the more comprehensive Water Tank Program - Uganda.

Under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Jesse Coker, a large-capacity water tank will be built to serve the needs of the Kanoni Bible College, located in Kanoni Sub-County, Kiruhura District, Uganda.

The school is a small three- year-old college that trains individuals to become church leaders within the Christian faith. There are 96 students currently attending the college, most of whom are district residents. The college works in association with Kanoni Archdeaconry, just next door to the college.

Kanoni Bible College and Kanoni Archdeaconry are both part of the small trading center of Kanoni, which occupies a stretch of dirt road less than a kilometer in length in a very rural part of a generally rural district.

The project to be undertaken is the construction of a 25,000 liter rainwater harvesting tank. This tank will be built using Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks (ISSBs).

Kanoni Water Tank Project - UgandaThe business of tank construction was started both to provide communities with clean drinking water and also to support the operations of Engari Community Health Centre, PCV Jesse Coker’s host organization.

The project also provides some community members with employment opportunities, as seven local builders have been trained in the ways of using this methodology. So far, the project has constructed three water storage tanks, all of 20,000 liter capacities. Two were built at the Engari Community Health Centre, and one was built at Sya Bright Future Primary School.

It is believed that the proposed project will be the catalyst for the business to gain momentum, on its way to becoming self-sufficient. The location of the tank is ideal for marketing, as all of the bricks will be made on site, next to a road filled with passers-by throughout the day.

The tank will be built just on the downslope side of Kanoni Bible College. The now- experienced team of five masons, with two alternates, will be constructing the tank over a period of three weeks. This includes making all of the bricks needed (about 1,200), digging and setting the foundation, laying the bricks and supporting apparatus, roofing, plastering, and finishing processes.

The bulk of the project costs are being paid by donations from local community members, with Water Charity funds making up the necessary balance. The community will also be providing assistance throughout the project with labor, such as helping to carry bricks from the roadside down to the building site, or by sifting murram in preparation for making the bricks.

Ninety-six students of the college, in addition to twelve faculty members, will be the main beneficiaries.

During holidays, or in times of need, the tank will be available to other community groups, such as the adjoining primary or secondary schools.

Kayunga District Youth Center Rainwater Catchment Project – Uganda WC

Kayunga District Youth Center Rainwater Catchment Project – Uganda This is the fourth project to be included under our Water Tank Program – Uganda. It will result in the construction of a system for capturing, storing, and distributing rainwater for use at the Kayunga District Youth Center.

The project is being implemented in Kayunga Town, Kayunga District, Central Uganda, under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Rebecca Workman. Rebecca previously completed the Kayunga District Handwashing Station Project - Uganda.

The Community
Kayunga District is a rural district located in Central Uganda along the River Nile. The residents of the District are very ethnically diverse: There are 52 different tribes that comprise Kayunga District. The majority of the population belongs to the Buganda Tribe of central Uganda, the Banyala Tribe, and refugee populations from other East and Central African countries fleeing hardship.

Most of the population earns their living through farming a variety of crops, herding livestock, and fishing along the River Nile and in Lake Kyoga, located in northern Kayunga District.

Kayunga Town is located in roughly the center of Kayunga District. It is a major trading stop between Uganda’s capital city of Kampala and Jinja Town.

Kayunga District Youth Center Rainwater Catchment Project – Uganda During the day, the town becomes a hub for business, resulting in a daytime population of roughly 32,000 people. The actual number of people who call Kayunga Town their home is roughly 28,000.

Kayunga Town also contains Kayunga District Hospital. The trading, the daily influx of people, and the District Hospital all lead to increased population and a considerable water shortage on a regular basis within the town.

Most residents of Kayunga Town in Kayunga West and Nakaliro have access to the town water system, which pumps water from the swamp outside of Kayunga Town, through a tap system, and into people’s homes. The main tank that stores this water is located just outside the property of Kayunga District Youth Center. The tank is not big enough to meet the needs of the people who rely on its water supply, and the tank often runs dry.

The pumps that extract the water from the swamp rely on consistent electricity, which has become increasingly unreliable since the middle of last year. Due to this unfortunate fact, tap water can be completely unavailable for periods lasting longer than a week, and the residents of Kayunga Town are forced to stand by and wait for the water they need, hoping that their previously stored supplies will not run dry.

There are currently only three boreholes in Kayunga Town, and they are all located in Kayunga West and Nakarilo. Residents will travel up to five kilometers to get water for their families. However, due to limited supply and consequently high prices, regular use of these boreholes becomes quite expensive for many members of the community, and, nearly every day, the boreholes are closed by their owners in an attempt to prevent overuse and to maintain the groundwater table. However, most residents do not understand this concept and are left with minimal water resources that are inadequate to meet their needs.

Kayunga District Youth Center Rainwater Catchment Project – Uganda Kayunga District Youth Center
The Kayunga District Youth Center was established in 2006 to build District capacity in identifying and providing HIV prevention, care, and treatment services to the surrounding population of Kayunga District. The objective of the center is to build infrastructure, capacity, and systems of local public and private partners in central Uganda to ensure sustainable, quality, comprehensive HIV and other health-related services for the surrounding communities.

The youth center population consists of youths ages 12 – 25, HIV+ youths and adults, TB+ youths and adults, and the hospital complex serving the entire district and surrounding communities.

The youth center staff go to rural health centers located in Kayunga, Mukono and Buvuma Districts daily to service the populations for HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment, TB assessment and referral, and Malaria prevention.

Although the youth center services all three districts, Kayunga District Youth Center is located in a part of Kayunga Town called Kayunga West and Nakaliro. In Kayunga Town, Kayunga District Youth Center focuses a majority of its efforts on improving the health care and lives of patients admitted to Kayunga District Hospital, which is a two-minute walk away from the Youth Center. While focusing on routine testing and counseling in the main hospital, the Youth Center also helps refer patients for safe and free medical male circumcision and runs a youth STI clinic that also works with TB screening.

The Project
This project is to build a rainwater catchment system for the use of the youth center and the residents of the town.

The heart of the system will be two new 15,000-liter rain collection tanks using the Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks (ISSB) construction technique. The technology is further described under our Interlocking Stabilized Soil Bricks Water Tank Program – Uganda

Roof gutters will be attached to the buildings, and piping will be run to direct the water from the gutters to the tanks. A first flush system will be installed for each tank, thus diverting contaminated water from the first rain of the season from the drinking water supply.

The project will be managed by a competent and dedicated community organization, Brick by Brick Construction that has experience in successfully implementing similar projects.

Benefits
The system will benefit 12,000 people, including those who use the services of the youth center, and the residents of the surrounding communities.

In addition to improving the sources of drinking water available to the youth center, the hospital, and surrounding communities, the collected water will be used to help keep buildings and latrines clean, which will lessen the transfer of illness as a result of hygiene issues.

To indicate your desire for your contribution to be allocated toward this project, please click the Donate button below.

Conclusion of Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – Thailand

Conclusion of Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – ThailandThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Heidi Mahoney. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to construct a new drainage system and elevate the ground around the center to prevent flooding, purchase a water purification tank connected to a common water canteen, and install sinks with running water.

Heidi reports:

We completed the drainage system, implemented the sinks/running water segment, and purchased/installed a clean drinking water canteen.

Throughout several meetings (before and after implementation) among administrators, laborers, parents, teachers, and villagers, project participants were able to retain the project goals, work out inconsistencies, and assess the project success after implementation.

Although there was a delay in purchasing materials, from that time forward, the project took a matter of weeks to complete.

Participants (consisting of civil servants, engineers, villagers, teachers, etc.) were required to communicate consistently and work through differences together in order to complete the project. Administrators and civil servants were responsible for the wellbeing and labor expenditures of villagers active in the construction process.

Construction workers were responsible for successfully implementing phase 1 and phase 2 of the project and ensuring that the new structures would be sustainable. Teachers, parents, and onlookers held all parties accountable by reinforcing the project goals and providing encouragement.

The project was a huge success, and I can't thank Water Charity enough on behalf of myself and my community.

We are grateful to Heidi, who has completed her Peace Corps service, for completing the project. We also wish to again thank The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust for providing the funding for the Water Charity participation in this project.

Conclusion of Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – ThailandConclusion of Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – Thailand
Conclusion of Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – ThailandConclusion of Jaidee Daycare Center Flood Remediation and Water Project – Thailand

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The Gambia

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaThis is a tremendous new project that is being implemented under the direction of Returned Peace Corps Volunteer Jeremy Mak. The project is to secure access to clean and protected water for Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Villages by installing 3 Blue Pumps.

Jeremy previously completed the Dankunku, Fula Kunda, and Brikama Lefaya Pump Project – The Gambia during his service as a Peace Corps Volunteer, and also finished the Niamina Dankunku Area Pump Project - The Gambia and the Sinchu Jaabo and Kaani Kunda Pump Project – The Gambia as a Returned Peace Corps Volunteer.

Project Location
Si Kunda and Kalikajara Villages, Niamina Dankunku District, and Choya Village, Niamina West District; Central River Region South, The Gambia, West Africa

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaDescription of Project Community
Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara are all ethnic Fula Villages. Most of them make their livelihoods through farming coos, peanuts, and rice in the dry season, and by tending cattle. Poverty is manifest in many ways, most prominently not having enough to eat. Compounded with poor water access (and use of open wells in Si Kunda and Kalikajara), sickness is common, as are skin diseases and other infections.

Water shortage is clearly an everyday problem, with people having to queue to draw water (or pump it at Choya's old Mark II, which was only recently rehabilitated with a previous Water Charity project). Yerro An, Si Kunda's alkalo, or village head, says, "We know our water is not clean or safe to drink, but what else can we do? We don't have any other sources of water."

Description of Project
This project seeks to secure access to clean and protected water for Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Villages by installing 3 Blue Pumps. Blue Pumps, made by Fairwater, are much more robust and long last than the typical outdated Mark II pumps seen in many villages, and the water output is much higher, averaging 12-20 liters a minute. It is much easier to use, especially for children, since there is less handle pressure resistance, and maintenance is minimal because of very few moving parts (as compared to the Mark II)

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaChoya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara each have or had Mark II pumps, but for a variety of reasons, are not having their water needs met. Si Kunda and Kalikajara are each now depending exclusively on open wells to meet their water needs, presenting serious health and sanitation concerns.

Choya in Niamina West has 380 residents / 23 compounds. One of their Mark II hand pumps work (only because it was rehabilitated through the last Water Charity project), the other does not--A pipe broke and the cylinder fell into the water. Villagers have tried two times to pull it out, but no luck. Sometimes water stresses are so heavy, that village women have to trek to fetch water in nearby Sara Bakary, Medina Wollom, or Sara Sambel.

Si Kunda in Niamina Dankunku has 300 residents / 17 compounds. They had two Mark II pumps installed 7 years ago. However, the pumps experienced problems 4 years ago. A local well mechanic pulled everything out, promising to bring new pipes and parts, but hasn't. The community, relying only on an open well for their needs and their cattle's water needs, opened the well last year to ease the dependence on that solitary well.

Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara Pump Project – The GambiaKalikajara in Niamina Dankunku has 115 residents / 11 compounds. Their Mark II pumps are 16 years old. They were pulled out 2 years ago. The pipes were stolen from the alkalo's compound, and so, the community opened the well and relies on the pulley and bucket system.

The Fairwater Foundation has agreed to donate 3 Blue Pumps, 1 each to Choya, Si Kunda, and Kalikajara, with possibly 1 more each for the latter 2 villages. These pumps cost more than $3,000 each installed. The only thing that Swe-Gam, the implementing partner, is asking for is roughly $500 for installation fees and fuel costs from Banjul.

Each community has already agreed to supply the cement, sand, and gravel needed to make the pedestal base for each Blue Pump.

To make a contribution for this project, please click the Donate button below.

$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of the SLOW LIFE Foundation as a part of their Clean Water Projects initiative.

We encourage others to continue to donate using the Donate button below, and we will notify Jeremy of your donation. Additional funds will be used to fund the next project by Jeremy and/or those of other PCVs in the country of service.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 21 - Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban Garden

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 21 - Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban GardenThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteer Marcie Todd. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Marcie reports:

Mohamadou is a different type of man. He is a combination of western and traditional with a focus on economic conservatism. He came back home from Spain when the economy got bad and he is now doing the best he can in the Fouladou. He owns a boutique and works in the cotton factory 5 months out of the year.

Mohamadou’s family is composed of himself, 2 wives, one of his wives’ sick parents, and 7 kids. Aisatou and Sona work hard around the house and take over the boutique when Mohamadou is gone. Aisatou also makes little donuts to sell on the side and they both take care of the garden and the children.

Tasks that seem as though they would be simple tend to take more time and energy than expected. For example making lunch, which for us would take 15 minutes maximum, takes 4 hours here. There aren’t many refrigerators, making it necessary to go to the market each day.

In order to get a ride into town, one must wait at a taxi garage until a car is filled and only then will it drive into town. Once one has returned from the market, it is time to start a fire. One must gather the wood and pull water for food preparation.

This is the prime example as to why installing pumps makes the lives of people a bit easier. It makes one aspect of life a little simpler, leaving more time and energy for the areas that require it.

Pump Output: 41 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 14 people

Funder: Katherine White

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 21 - Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban GardenConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 21 - Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban Garden

Water Tank Program - Uganda

Water Tank Program - UgandaWith the implementation of our 5th water tank project in Uganda (our 13th project overall in Uganda), we introduce our latest large-scale Water Charity program. Water Tank Program – Uganda will be a concentrated effort to raise funds for and implement an ongoing series of water storage tanks in the country.

The need for water storage capability in rural Uganda is huge, with only 55% of the population of the country having access to safe water. Often there is no public water source.

Water tanks represent an important tool in the arsenal to make safe water available to all. As part of a rainwater harvesting system, it allows water to be collected when available and stored for use as needed.

There are many different technologies than can be used to construct water tanks, and many factors to be considered in the choice in every situation. Cost, local materials available, skilled labor, and local preferences are but a few.

Water Charity has implemented many water tank projects in different countries of the world. In Uganda, with the start of our newest project, here are our accomplishments:

You can see how important water tanks are to the health and wellbeing of the population. Because of the high impact of such projects, in addition to the relative ease of implementation, we decided to engage in a focused fundraising campaign to continue to do projects of this type elsewhere in the country.

We will continue to build tanks as quickly as funding will allow. If you agree with our approach please give generously to program by clicking on the Donate button below. Your contributions, as always, are tax-deductible. 100% of all donations are applied directly to projects in the field.

52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 21 - Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban Garden

52 Pumps – Senegal – Project 21- Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban GardenThis project is part of our 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks Program, being implemented by Peace Corps Volunteers Marcie Todd and Garrison Harward. To read about the program and follow its progress, CLICK HERE.

Location
Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Kolda, Senegal

Community Description
Facing the Kolda cotton factory is a quartier called Samba Koulibaly, named after a Malian man who, years before the cotton factory, arrived when there was not even a paved road going through Kolda. Samba Koulibaly’s namesakes will probably remain the chiefs of the quartier until the end of time.

The cotton factory is the largest employer in Kolda, where jobs are among the most secure that one can attain. Although it is only seasonal work, they pay nicely, and one knows that for 5 months there will be a steady income.

Mohamadou Djamanka until recently worked in a factory in Spain where he sent money back to his family. He now owns a boutique facing of the cotton factory where he works every day from 7 am to 11:30 pm, unless it is cotton-processing season. During that time his two wives take turns manning the boutique and he crosses the street to work, clothed from head to toe, ready for the work at hand.

52 Pumps – Senegal – Project 21- Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban GardenAll year long Mohamadou’s wives and kids grow vegetables in a small plot near their house. They usually have enough to eat and a bit to sell. They are the definition of urban gardening, here in Kolda.

Many Koldans grow everyday veggies, but many more only grow essential grains like rice, corn, and millet during rainy season. Mohamadou and his family believe they should be saving money on vegetables and growing them themselves.

One day while I was hanging out at Mohamadou’s boutique he showed me the math of the money he was saving each month by gardening in his small plot and it was upwards of $27, which doesn’t sound like a lot, but is.

Project Description
This project is to build a pump at a well that is used to irrigate the plot worked by Mohamadou Djamanka and his family.

52 Pumps – Senegal – Project 21- Sincan Samba Koulibaly, Urban GardenProject Impact
14 men, women, and children will benefit from the project.

Peace Corps Volunteer Directing Project
Marcie Todd

Comments
“The food situation in Senegal and throughout the world is in a dire state. Rising food prices combined with a limited availability of food has led to misery and malnutrition, rapidly hitting the world’s poorest and developing populations the hardest. In Senegal, with nearly half of all families considered “food insecure” by the World Food Program and half the population living in large towns and cities, there is a growing need for individuals and families to produce their own food.”
Peace Corps Senegal, Urban Agriculture Website.

Dollar Amount of Project
$100.00

Donations Collected to Date
$100.00

Dollar Amount Needed
$0.00 - This project has now been fully funded through the generosity of Katherine White, of Ojai, CA, USA.

If you now contribute $150 (our new price, which includes labor), your name will be placed on the waiting list to adopt the next project in order.

If you wish to contribute less than $150, the money will be applied toward the overall program.

This project has been finished. To read about the conclusion of the project, CLICK HERE.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 20 - Saare Dagua, Community Well

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 20 - Saare Dagua, Community WellThis project has been completed under the direction of Peace Corps Volunteers Garrison Harward and C.J. Pederson. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

Garrison reports:

This install had the same slight problem as #19 with our experimental turn block system but aside from that everything went very smoothly. We made the cap and told the village that by the time we came back everything needed to be cleaned out of the bottom of the well. Occasionally buckets or sticks will fall down and these can get tangled with the rope so they must be removed before the pump can be mounted.

Anyway, when we got back this wasn’t done yet, so we told the village we couldn’t do the pump. They immediately sprang into action rigging up a harness and sending a kid down to clean out everything. Don’t worry he was fine. Just like I said everything went smoothly.

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 20 - Saare Dagua, Community WellWith the well cleaned out, we mounted the pump and installed the pipe and turn block. Then it was time to turn the wheel, the moment of truth. This is always a little bit nerve wracking, even after so many installs and more so now after our last experiment failure. This time though it worked perfectly!

The kids all crowded around and immediately started drinking the water and showering underneath the spout. It’s always fun to see them play in the water that’s normally such a rare commodity, which is strenuous to pull up and thus never wasted on games. Of course, games are just the beginning of the benefits here as the whole village is thankful for the ease with which they can now pull water. Surely the cows are less thirsty too!

Pump Output: 38 Liters/ Min

Total Number of People Benefiting: 340

Funder: Vicki Ringer

Conclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 20 - Saare Dagua, Community WellConclusion of 52 Pumps in 52 Weeks – Senegal – Project 20 - Saare Dagua, Community Well

Conclusion of Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – India

Conclusion of Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – IndiaThis project has been completed under the direction of Samerth Charitable Trust. To read about the beginning of the project, CLICK HERE.

The project was to build two rainwater harvesting systems in Javavandh and a well in Mansangh vandh (hamlet) of Rapar Taluka, Gujarat, India.

Gazala Paul, Managing Trustee of Samerth, informs us that the two rainwater harvesting structures were built, and two wells were dug, to the benefit of 400 people of the Small Runn of Kutch.

Gazala reports:

There are 35 households in Javavandh and the population is around 200 people, including men, women, and children. An underground tank was built, with a capacity of 10,000 liters, to serve the community. The facility can now provide water to the people of Javavndh for a period of 40 to 60 days.

In addition, a rainwater harvesting system was constructed at Gaunthana village school where 50 children are enrolled. The school, located 7 Kilometers inside of the main village of Mangadh, now has access to pure drinking water. The regular supply of water is available for use by the general public as well.

Also, two dug wells were constructed at Gaunthana village, which is one of the last habitats near the Small Runn of Kutch. These wells now serve 35 households, with a population of 100 people living in the village, and 150 people from surrounding areas.

The dug wells are situated near a traditional village pond. The monsoon rainwater will recharge these two dug wells, and therefore the community will have access to water year-round. There is also ample water for the needs of the cattle.

We are grateful to Samerth Charitable Trust for completing the project, and again express our gratitude to The Soneva SLOW LIFE Trust and Positive H2O (+H2O) for providing the funding.

Conclusion of Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – IndiaConclusion of Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – India
Conclusion of Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – IndiaConclusion of Javavandh Rainwater Harvesting Project and Mansangh Vandh Well Project – India




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Water Charity Honored

Water Charity Honored by Metropolitan Water District on World Water Day 2010

Water Charity was honored by the Metroplitan Water District and Friends of United Nations on World Water Day 2010 for our work in helping people obtain clean water worldwide.

WHO Guidelines for Drinking Water Quality

The Guidelines for Drinking-water Quality, third edition is now available as one integrated volume incorporating revisions reflected in the First and Second addenda.

http://bit.ly/2T08O

Quotations

Water is the only drink for a wise man.
Henry David Thoreau
US Transcendentalist author (1817 - 1862)